Coming Up
  • Fri., Apr. 18, 2014 6:00PM - 8:30PM CDT Tailgate Tour: Rice Lake party

    The Green Bay Packers announced plans for the ninth ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour,’ set for April 15-19. This year’s tour includes two stops in Michigan, in addition to three Wisconsin stops, to visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

    Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Jarrett Bush, Brad Jones and Mason Crosby, and Packers alumni Paul Coffman, Lynn Dickey and James Lofton.

    The tailgate parties will welcome the players and alumni arriving at each location at 6 p.m., and will run until 8:30 p.m., except in Merrill, where the tailgate party will take place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. A local non-profit organization will host each party which will feature food, giveaways, question-and-answer sessions and autographs. Tailgate party tickets cost $30.

    General admission tickets also will be available for $5, which includes access to the Q-and-A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Due to space limitations, no general admission tickets will be available in Ironwood. 

    One hundred percent of the Tailgate Tour proceeds will benefit the hosting organizations.

    Tickets for the tailgate parties at all locations will go on sale Friday, Feb. 28. ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour’ tailgate party locations, hosting organizations and ticket information are as follows:

    Rice Lake: Barron County Fairgrounds. To benefit Benjamin’s House. Tickets on sale at Marketplace Foods, 330 S. Main St., Rice Lake; and Rainbow Home Center, 1124 Hammond Ave., Rice Lake.

  • Sat., Apr. 19, 2014 12:30PM - 3:00PM CDT Tailgate Tour: Merrill party

    The Green Bay Packers announced plans for the ninth ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour,’ set for April 15-19. This year’s tour includes two stops in Michigan, in addition to three Wisconsin stops, to visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

    Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Jarrett Bush, Brad Jones and Mason Crosby, and Packers alumni Paul Coffman, Lynn Dickey and James Lofton.

    The tailgate parties will welcome the players and alumni arriving at each location at 6 p.m., and will run until 8:30 p.m., except in Merrill, where the tailgate party will take place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. A local non-profit organization will host each party which will feature food, giveaways, question-and-answer sessions and autographs. Tailgate party tickets cost $30.

    General admission tickets also will be available for $5, which includes access to the Q-and-A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Due to space limitations, no general admission tickets will be available in Ironwood. 

    One hundred percent of the Tailgate Tour proceeds will benefit the hosting organizations.

    Tickets for the tailgate parties at all locations will go on sale Friday, Feb. 28. ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour’ tailgate party locations, hosting organizations and ticket information are as follows:

    Merrill: MARC. To benefit Riverbend Trail. Tickets on sale at Merrill Chamber of Commerce, 705 N. Center Ave., Merrill; Dave’s County Market, 300 E. 1st St., Merrill; and Drew’s Piggly Wiggly, 3404 E. Main St., Merrill. Tickets also available online at www.merrillchamber.org.

  • Sat., Apr. 26, 2014 8:00AM - 6:00PM CDT Packers Pro Shop Tent Sale

    The sale is taking place earlier than in previous years, due to the construction at Lambeau Field and the work that the Pro Shop team must complete in preparation for the new store, which will open this summer. Visitors to Lambeau Field should enter the Atrium through the Oneida Nation Gate. Parking is available in the lot on Lambeau Field’s east side near the Oneida Nation Gate, which can be accessed off Oneida Street and Lombardi Avenue.

    The sale will feature the traditional mix of Pro Shop items greatly reduced in price and other special purchases.

    The team’s football operations staff also has provided Packers team apparel no longer in use, including a large assortment of t-shirts, shorts, jackets, jerseys and pants. Some items are practice-worn gear not normally available in the Pro Shop.

    The tent sale began in 1994 in the parking lot outside the former Pro Shop on the north end of Lambeau Field and grew into a popular event. Now in its 11th year in the Atrium, the tent sale also was held in the west side stadium concourse in previous years.

     
  • Sat., May. 10, 2014 7:00PM CDT Eddie Lacy appearance 22nd Annual Doug Jirschele Memorial Sports Award Banquet
  • Sat., Jun. 07, 2014 8:30AM - 3:30PM CDT JPP Kids Clinic

    The 17th annual Junior Power Pack Kids Clinic is set for Saturday, June 7, 2014 in the Don Hutson Center with sessions ranging from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

    The Junior Power Pack Clinic gives members ages 5-14 years old the opportunity to practice football skills and drills with other Packers backers and a few up-and-coming Packers players.  Parents/Guardians are welcome to come and watch their child/ren participate in the clinic. 

    Members may choose one of three sessions to attend:

    • Session 1 – 8:30 to 10 a.m.
    • Session 2 – 11 to 12:30 p.m.
    • Session 3 – 2 to 3:30 p.m.


    The event will be held inside the Don Hutson Center, the Packers indoor practice facility. Parking for the event is available in the lot on Lambeau Field’s east side near the Oneida Nation Gate.  

    The Junior Power Pack Clinic is a member’s only event and will have a registration fee of $5.

    Deadline to register:

    • New Members – May 11, 2014
    • Current Members – May 18, 2014


    To sign up to become a member of the Junior Power Pack and receive an invitation to the clinic fans can go to www.packers.com/jpp.

     

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Combine needs fans for it to continue rise in popularity

Posted Feb 24, 2014

Scouting world will determine combine’s fate

Pitt DL Aaron Donald

GREEN BAY—The NFL wants to make the scouting combine a Super Bowl-like offseason event. For that to happen, the league may have to take control of it away from the people that created it.

In 2012 and ’13, the NFL opened the combine doors for free to a few hundred diehard fans. It was precedent setting and the league would like to advance that practice by selling some pricey ticket packages to draft-crazy fans that envision the combine to be a kind of football winter Olympics. After that, who knows?

One problem: The league’s general managers are not in favor of opening the doors to the kingdom they created. Hey, they had agreed to allow the media to occupy a nearby room, and then the NFL scouting bosses winced as NFL Network began televising the event, but no way would they allow the combine to be marketed to fans, even at a price that would help pay the scouting czars’ salaries.

It’s almost comical. The fan can see for free on TV what the league could charge the fan to view in person, but the czars say no. That’s why the scouting combine isn’t likely to become a Super Bowl-like offseason event.

“The first combine I went to, there was no media,” packers.com draft contributor Tony Pauline said. “There was no media room. I was outside the exit gate trying to get information. A lot of media people like it because you have one central area where you can talk to coaches, general managers, prospects. Media like it because they don’t have to work the phones.”

The league likes it because it was with the decision to bring the media inside the building that the scouting combine began to rise in popularity and profile. Whether you like the media or hate the media, there’s no denying its power. It can make you, or it can break you. It has made the combine what it is.

Nine hundred press credentials were distributed for this past weekend’s festivities. Once upon a time, a few hardened football beat reporters stood in the lobby of the Crowne Plaza Hotel, waiting for scouts, general managers, coaches and agents to walk by and then stop to offer a few comments.

The doors to this year’s combine opened to us on Thursday morning. On Sunday at 5 p.m., we were told to leave to not return, even though the workouts wouldn’t shift into high gear until Monday morning. Jadeveon Clowney and Aaron Donald stole the show on Monday morning, but we were already gone.

Why doesn’t the media complain? It’s because by Sunday afternoon the media is bored out of its mind and just wants to go home.

“The weekend is just for the media, but the combine goes on until Tuesday,” Pauline said.

So why did so many media people attend something they were forbidden to see and forced to leave before it’s complete? Michael Sam, that’s why.

“You have to keep having stories like Michael Sam and Manti Te’o. If there’s no huge story like that, I don’t think you’re going to see 900 people next year,” Pauline said.

What we may have seen this past weekend is the peak of the combine’s popularity. Unless it can continue delivering Sam-like and Te’o-like press conferences, the combine is unlikely to continue its rise.

It needs drama to do that, and it needs for draft prospects to provide that drama in on-the-field competition, which is another issue confronting the league in its promotion of the combine. Star players declining to participate in workouts won’t work, and neither will the refusal of the league’s football brass to open their doors.

The czars hold the key to the combine’s future. They can breathe more life into it and further popularize the game of professional football, or they can continue to control and sanitize an event that, frankly, isn’t nearly as important as we delude ourselves into believing it is.

 
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