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  • Thu., Apr. 17, 2014 6:00PM - 8:30PM CDT Tailgate Tour: Superior party

    The Green Bay Packers announced plans for the ninth ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour,’ set for April 15-19. This year’s tour includes two stops in Michigan, in addition to three Wisconsin stops, to visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

    Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Jarrett Bush, Brad Jones and Mason Crosby, and Packers alumni Paul Coffman, Lynn Dickey and James Lofton.

    The tailgate parties will welcome the players and alumni arriving at each location at 6 p.m., and will run until 8:30 p.m., except in Merrill, where the tailgate party will take place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. A local non-profit organization will host each party which will feature food, giveaways, question-and-answer sessions and autographs. Tailgate party tickets cost $30.

    General admission tickets also will be available for $5, which includes access to the Q-and-A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Due to space limitations, no general admission tickets will be available in Ironwood. 

    One hundred percent of the Tailgate Tour proceeds will benefit the hosting organizations.

    Tickets for the tailgate parties at all locations will go on sale Friday, Feb. 28. ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour’ tailgate party locations, hosting organizations and ticket information are as follows:

    Superior: Superior High School. To benefit the National Bank Commerce Spartan Sports Complex. Tickets on sale at Screen Graphics, 1327 Banks Ave., Superior.

  • Fri., Apr. 18, 2014 6:00PM - 8:30PM CDT Tailgate Tour: Rice Lake party

    The Green Bay Packers announced plans for the ninth ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour,’ set for April 15-19. This year’s tour includes two stops in Michigan, in addition to three Wisconsin stops, to visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

    Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Jarrett Bush, Brad Jones and Mason Crosby, and Packers alumni Paul Coffman, Lynn Dickey and James Lofton.

    The tailgate parties will welcome the players and alumni arriving at each location at 6 p.m., and will run until 8:30 p.m., except in Merrill, where the tailgate party will take place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. A local non-profit organization will host each party which will feature food, giveaways, question-and-answer sessions and autographs. Tailgate party tickets cost $30.

    General admission tickets also will be available for $5, which includes access to the Q-and-A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Due to space limitations, no general admission tickets will be available in Ironwood. 

    One hundred percent of the Tailgate Tour proceeds will benefit the hosting organizations.

    Tickets for the tailgate parties at all locations will go on sale Friday, Feb. 28. ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour’ tailgate party locations, hosting organizations and ticket information are as follows:

    Rice Lake: Barron County Fairgrounds. To benefit Benjamin’s House. Tickets on sale at Marketplace Foods, 330 S. Main St., Rice Lake; and Rainbow Home Center, 1124 Hammond Ave., Rice Lake.

  • Sat., Apr. 19, 2014 12:30PM - 3:00PM CDT Tailgate Tour: Merrill party

    The Green Bay Packers announced plans for the ninth ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour,’ set for April 15-19. This year’s tour includes two stops in Michigan, in addition to three Wisconsin stops, to visit with fans and thank them in person for their support.

    Tour celebrities will include Packers President/CEO Mark Murphy, players Jarrett Bush, Brad Jones and Mason Crosby, and Packers alumni Paul Coffman, Lynn Dickey and James Lofton.

    The tailgate parties will welcome the players and alumni arriving at each location at 6 p.m., and will run until 8:30 p.m., except in Merrill, where the tailgate party will take place from 12:30 to 3 p.m. A local non-profit organization will host each party which will feature food, giveaways, question-and-answer sessions and autographs. Tailgate party tickets cost $30.

    General admission tickets also will be available for $5, which includes access to the Q-and-A sessions as well as tailgate party activities. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Due to space limitations, no general admission tickets will be available in Ironwood. 

    One hundred percent of the Tailgate Tour proceeds will benefit the hosting organizations.

    Tickets for the tailgate parties at all locations will go on sale Friday, Feb. 28. ‘Green Bay Packers Tailgate Tour’ tailgate party locations, hosting organizations and ticket information are as follows:

    Merrill: MARC. To benefit Riverbend Trail. Tickets on sale at Merrill Chamber of Commerce, 705 N. Center Ave., Merrill; Dave’s County Market, 300 E. 1st St., Merrill; and Drew’s Piggly Wiggly, 3404 E. Main St., Merrill. Tickets also available online at www.merrillchamber.org.

  • Sat., Apr. 26, 2014 8:00AM - 6:00PM CDT Packers Pro Shop Tent Sale

    The sale is taking place earlier than in previous years, due to the construction at Lambeau Field and the work that the Pro Shop team must complete in preparation for the new store, which will open this summer. Visitors to Lambeau Field should enter the Atrium through the Oneida Nation Gate. Parking is available in the lot on Lambeau Field’s east side near the Oneida Nation Gate, which can be accessed off Oneida Street and Lombardi Avenue.

    The sale will feature the traditional mix of Pro Shop items greatly reduced in price and other special purchases.

    The team’s football operations staff also has provided Packers team apparel no longer in use, including a large assortment of t-shirts, shorts, jackets, jerseys and pants. Some items are practice-worn gear not normally available in the Pro Shop.

    The tent sale began in 1994 in the parking lot outside the former Pro Shop on the north end of Lambeau Field and grew into a popular event. Now in its 11th year in the Atrium, the tent sale also was held in the west side stadium concourse in previous years.

     
  • Sat., May. 10, 2014 7:00PM CDT Eddie Lacy appearance 22nd Annual Doug Jirschele Memorial Sports Award Banquet
  • Sat., Jun. 07, 2014 8:30AM - 3:30PM CDT JPP Kids Clinic

    The 17th annual Junior Power Pack Kids Clinic is set for Saturday, June 7, 2014 in the Don Hutson Center with sessions ranging from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

    The Junior Power Pack Clinic gives members ages 5-14 years old the opportunity to practice football skills and drills with other Packers backers and a few up-and-coming Packers players.  Parents/Guardians are welcome to come and watch their child/ren participate in the clinic. 

    Members may choose one of three sessions to attend:

    • Session 1 – 8:30 to 10 a.m.
    • Session 2 – 11 to 12:30 p.m.
    • Session 3 – 2 to 3:30 p.m.


    The event will be held inside the Don Hutson Center, the Packers indoor practice facility. Parking for the event is available in the lot on Lambeau Field’s east side near the Oneida Nation Gate.  

    The Junior Power Pack Clinic is a member’s only event and will have a registration fee of $5.

    Deadline to register:

    • New Members – May 11, 2014
    • Current Members – May 18, 2014


    To sign up to become a member of the Junior Power Pack and receive an invitation to the clinic fans can go to www.packers.com/jpp.

     

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Veterans Focused On Seizing This Chance

Posted Jan 19, 2011

Whatever it takes to deliver the message, four veteran players in the Green Bay Packers’ locker room plan to get the point across by Sunday afternoon.

“You try to tell the young players how hard it is to get yourself in this position to go to the Super Bowl,” defensive end Ryan Pickett said. “It’s not every year you make it this far. We have a special opportunity right now. We have a great chance to do something special.”

Players like Pickett, cornerback Charles Woodson, offensive tackle Chad Clifton and receiver Donald Driver will go about stressing that in their own ways this week leading up to Sunday’s NFC Championship in Chicago.

They’re the four players on the Packers’ roster who are in double digits in terms of years in this league, and not one has ever won a Super Bowl. A collective 46 years of experience, counting this year, and no rings. Yet.

Woodson and Pickett have come the closest. Before both came to the Packers as free agents in 2006, they had advanced to Super Bowls with their original teams. But those moments feel like ancient history to them now.

For Woodson, it was 2002 with the Raiders, who lost to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. He got a crack at an AFC Championship two years earlier against Baltimore, and then again in 2007 with the Packers, and the 13-year pro has stated more than once his sole reason for continuing to play at age 34 is to win that elusive title.

“For every player in the NFL, these are the moments that you play for, to have an opportunity,” Woodson said. “I've been once, and it was an incredible experience. It's been a long time ago, though, now. The thing is you never know when you'll get back. You never know if you'll get there. You never know if you'll win one. But to have the opportunity, and again, to be one of the final teams trying to get to the Super Bowl, it means a lot.”

For Pickett, he reached the Super Bowl as a rookie with St. Louis in 2001, but the Rams were upset by the upstart New England Patriots. It was another six years before he got back to a conference title game, with the ’07 Packers, and back then he remembered feeling as a rookie that he’d get a lot more chances after playing in a Super Bowl so young.

But in nine years he’s never been back, and only twice has he gotten this far again, one win away. That’s the reality he’s trying to convey to any younger teammates he talks to.

“It was my rookie year, so long ago,” Pickett said. “I try to let them know this is my 10th year, and I haven’t been but one time. There’s a lot of guys like Driver who’ve never been. This is a special opportunity we have, so we have to make the best of it.”

Clifton and Driver, of course, have both had their close calls as Packers, playing in Green Bay their entire careers.

They were drafted one year apart – Clifton in 2000, Driver in 1999 – and they’ve been through the biggest heartaches together. Fourth-and-26 in Philadelphia seven years ago, and the overtime loss to the Giants at Lambeau Field three years back.

But those aren’t motivating factors as much as Father Time and the nature of the business itself.

“You can’t talk about the past,” Driver said. “You have to talk about the future. The past is gone. It’s a new day, and I’m happy to be in the NFC Championship once again.

“It’s only one chance. One chance to win it all. You don’t get that chance often. It’s right in front of us what we want, and that’s to get to the Super Bowl.”

One of the quieter guys in the locker room, Clifton is well-respected by his mates on the offensive line and probably doesn’t need to say much for anyone to know what this chance means to him.

Driver doesn’t have to say anything either, but he has said plenty in the past amidst his close-knit, outgoing receiving corps, which has always embraced his leadership.

“It’s huge for him,” receiver James Jones said. “Who knows how long he’s going to play? We’re trying to get him a Super Bowl ring. Not saying one’s guaranteed for all of us, but we’ve all got a little more time than he has. Every time we go out there we try to make plays and make plays for him and get him a ring.”

That feeling is reciprocated, because of what 12 years in the NFL have taught an ultimate competitor like Driver.

“As bad as they want to get me to the Super Bowl, I want to get them to the Super Bowl, so when it comes to their career, they don’t have to worry when they’re going to get there,” Driver said. “If we can all get there together at one time, that would put a nice little icing on the cake.”

Head Coach Mike McCarthy acknowledged he can sense the “urgency” coming from “Donald all the way down,” and he feels that kind of locker-room leadership at times like this is healthy for the entire team, especially since plenty of the still-young players were even younger three years ago when they got their first shot.

McCarthy himself remembers getting to the AFC Championship Game his first year as an NFL coach, with Kansas City in 1993, and he didn’t realize how big a deal it was until it took him 14 years to return to that stage, in his second year at the Green Bay helm.

So he appreciates exactly where the veterans are coming from, and there’s no need to hide from that reality. He sees the message getting through in a positive way.

“Just the urgency, the messaging from the veteran players to the younger players, I really like the pulse of our team, the energy of practice today,” McCarthy said. “They’re just really into it.

“It starts with the guys like Donald, Charles Woodson. You have conversations with those guys, and they know how important it is to get this opportunity accomplished, because you don’t know when it’s going to happen again.”

Additional coverage - Jan. 19

 
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