On Now
Coming Up
  • Sun., May. 03, 2015 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM CDT Jared Abbrederis appearance

    Staff Appreciation Week

  • Tue., May. 26, 2015 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM CDT Green Bay Packers Blood Drive

    Green Bay Packers Blood Drive

    Sponsor code – Packers

  • Sun., May. 31, 2015 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM CDT Packers Coaching School

    The Green Bay Packers are set to host the team’s second annual “Green Bay Packers Coaching School” at Lambeau Field on Sunday, May 31, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

    The complimentary coaching school has a curriculum exclusively designed for youth football coaches, and can accommodate a maximum of 300 coaches. The event will feature innovative classroom sessions in the Lambeau Field Atrium, as well as on-field football instruction from top local high school and youth football coaches in the Don Hutson Center.

  • Sat., Jun. 06, 2015 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM CDT Junior Power Pack Kids Clinic The 18th annual Junior Power Pack Kids Clinic is set for Saturday, June 6, inside the Don Hutson Center, the Packers’ indoor practice facility.
  • Sat., Jun. 20, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM CDT Jared Abbrederis appearance 11th Annual Youth Football Golf Outing
  • Sat., Jun. 20, 2015 12:00 PM CDT Kenny Chesney/Jason Aldean concert Jason Aldean and Kenny Chesney have announced that their tours, The Burn It Down Tour and The Big Revival Tour presented by Corona Light, will collide for 10 stadium shows next summer, including Lambeau Field on Saturday, June 20, 2015.  More on-sale information and special guests will be revealed over the coming weeks.

Front Office

Bob Harlan
Chairman Emeritus

Biography

  • Retired Jan. 28, 2008, and became chairman emeritus after a 37-year career with the organization, including 19 years as principal executive.
  • Originally joined the organization as assistant general manager on June 1, 1971. Also served as corporate general manager (1975-81), corporate assistant to the president (1981-88), executive vice president of administration (1988-89), president and CEO (1989-2006), chairman and CEO (2006-07) and chairman (2007).
  • Inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, July 17, 2004.
  • Under his guidance, franchise posted a .500-or-better season 13 straight years (1992-2004) for the first time since the 1930s and '40s (1934-47).
  • Packers own the NFL's best record, 152-88, since 1993, the dawn of free agency and the salary cap, a period many observers predicted would send Green Bay into a downward spiral.
  • In addition to the Super Bowl ring from the Packers' 1996 championship, possesses a 1967 World Series ring, earned while he worked for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bob Harlan is enjoying his "second" career with the Packers as the organization's chairman emeritus. Having retired Jan. 28, 2008, after 37 years with the organization, including 19 as its principal executive, he serves the organization as a goodwill ambassador, appearing on behalf of the club at events and in the community. Although a different position for him, its duties are not, for throughout his tenure as CEO, the genial Harlan built and maintained considerable goodwill on behalf of the storied franchise.

Harlan transitioned into his latest career with a solid legacy in place. The team enjoyed tremendous success under his stewardship and also is positioned to succeed well into the future under the leadership of President/CEO Mark Murphy and a talented staff.

Off the field, the crowning achievement of Harlan's tenure - the $295 million redevelopment of historic Lambeau Field - was ushered in at the beginning of the 2003 campaign and stands as the chief component for assuring the team's financial survival for the next generation.

On the field, the Packers enjoyed a resurgence under Harlan's guidance, posting the league's best overall record, 152-88, from 1993-2007, and returning the Lombardi Trophy to Green Bay with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI. The successful period also included 13 straight .500-or-better seasons (1992-2004), an impressive accomplishment in this era of free agency and the team's best stretch since the 1930s and '40s.

A member of the club's front office since 1971, the veteran Packers official made two major decisions late in the 1991 season. Convinced the organization was merely treading water competitively, he first relieved then-executive vice president Tom Braatz of his responsibilities Nov. 20, 1991, and, one week later, named Ron Wolf as executive vice president and general manager, with total authority over football operations.

Wolf was chosen 'NFL Executive of the Year' by Sporting News following his first full season with the Packers, which saw him hire Mike Holmgren as head coach and acquire Pro Bowl quarterback Brett Favre in 1992 in one of pro football's most acclaimed trades ever. He subsequently "recruited" perennial Pro Bowl defensive end Reggie White, the game's most sought-after unrestricted free agent, in 1993.

During the productive interim, the Packers advanced to the playoffs for six consecutive years - the first such accomplishment in franchise history - climaxing their 1996 achievements by reaching and winning the Super Bowl for the first time in 29 years and following that singular achievement by returning to the Super Bowl in January of 1998.

In 2005, Harlan hired Ted Thompson as the team's general manager, and Thompson has built the Packers into one of the NFL's strongest young teams, with the 2007 squad tying a team record for victories with a 13-3 regular-season mark en route to the division title and an appearance in the NFC Championship.

Harlan fittingly was honored July 17, 2004, with his induction into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. His mark on the franchise earlier was recognized Sept. 2, 2003, with the dedication of the Robert E. Harlan Plaza, in front of the main entrance to Lambeau Field. It is marked by a plaque featured between the statues of team founder Curly Lambeau and Hall of Fame coach Vince Lombardi.

Other notable achievements include the 1994 decision to leave Milwaukee, ending a 62-year stay, and play all home games in Green Bay; launching the fourth stock sale in the team's history in 1997, a mechanism which produced more than $20 million in "new money" and in excess of 100,000 new shareholders; and authorizing construction of the Don Hutson Center, the team's "state of the art" indoor practice facility.

Under Harlan, the organization also has been accorded national acclaim for its consistently high quality of operation. Additionally, the team ranked among the league's most popular the last several years and merchandise sales consistently land in the NFL's top five.

The affable Iowan, who was involved in every area of the club's operations over the course of his three-plus decade career, joined the organization as assistant general manager on June 1, 1971, after serving as director of public relations for the St. Louis baseball Cardinals. He earlier earned a B.S. degree in journalism from Marquette in 1958 and had a brief tour of duty in the U.S. Army before spending six months as a general reporter for United Press International in Milwaukee. He subsequently became sports information director at Marquette in 1959, then joined the Cardinals in 1965, acting as director of community relations and the speakers' bureau for two years and as director of public relations for three-and-a-half years before joining the Packers.

Harlan currently serves on the board of directors for a number of community organizations and has been the recipient of multiple honors, both on a local and state basis, including being honored three times by his alma mater, Marquette University, in 1997. In 2007, he penned his autobiography, Green and Golden Moments: Bob Harlan and the Green Bay Packers.

Born Robert Ernest Harlan in Des Moines, Iowa, he and his wife, Madeline, have three sons, Kevin, Bryan, and Michael, plus four grandchildren.

  • Retired Jan. 28, 2008, and became chairman emeritus after a 37-year career with the organization, including 19 years as principal executive.
  • Originally joined the organization as assistant general manager on June 1, 1971. Also served as corporate general manager (1975-81), corporate assistant to the president (1981-88), executive vice president of administration (1988-89), president and CEO (1989-2006), chairman and CEO (2006-07) and chairman (2007).
  • Inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, July 17, 2004.
  • Under his guidance, franchise posted a .500-or-better season 13 straight years (1992-2004) for the first time since the 1930s and '40s (1934-47).
  • Packers own the NFL's best record, 152-88, since 1993, the dawn of free agency and the salary cap, a period many observers predicted would send Green Bay into a downward spiral.
  • In addition to the Super Bowl ring from the Packers' 1996 championship, possesses a 1967 World Series ring, earned while he worked for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bob Harlan is enjoying his "second" career with the Packers as the organization's chairman emeritus. Having retired Jan. 28, 2008, after 37 years with the organization, including 19 as its principal executive, he serves the organization as a goodwill ambassador, appearing on behalf of the club at events and in the community. Although a different position for him, its duties are not, for throughout his tenure as CEO, the genial Harlan built and maintained considerable goodwill on behalf of the storied franchise.

Harlan transitioned into his latest career with a solid legacy in place. The team enjoyed tremendous success under his stewardship and also is positioned to succeed well into the future under the leadership of President/CEO Mark Murphy and a talented staff.

Off the field, the crowning achievement of Harlan's tenure - the $295 million redevelopment of historic Lambeau Field - was ushered in at the beginning of the 2003 campaign and stands as the chief component for assuring the team's financial survival for the next generation.

On the field, the Packers enjoyed a resurgence under Harlan's guidance, posting the league's best overall record, 152-88, from 1993-2007, and returning the Lombardi Trophy to Green Bay with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI. The successful period also included 13 straight .500-or-better seasons (1992-2004), an impressive accomplishment in this era of free agency and the team's best stretch since the 1930s and '40s.

A member of the club's front office since 1971, the veteran Packers official made two major decisions late in the 1991 season. Convinced the organization was merely treading water competitively, he first relieved then-executive vice president Tom Braatz of his responsibilities Nov. 20, 1991, and, one week later, named Ron Wolf as executive vice president and general manager, with total authority over football operations.

Wolf was chosen 'NFL Executive of the Year' by Sporting News following his first full season with the Packers, which saw him hire Mike Holmgren as head coach and acquire Pro Bowl quarterback Brett Favre in 1992 in one of pro football's most acclaimed trades ever. He subsequently "recruited" perennial Pro Bowl defensive end Reggie White, the game's most sought-after unrestricted free agent, in 1993.

During the productive interim, the Packers advanced to the playoffs for six consecutive years - the first such accomplishment in franchise history - climaxing their 1996 achievements by reaching and winning the Super Bowl for the first time in 29 years and following that singular achievement by returning to the Super Bowl in January of 1998.

In 2005, Harlan hired Ted Thompson as the team's general manager, and Thompson has built the Packers into one of the NFL's strongest young teams, with the 2007 squad tying a team record for victories with a 13-3 regular-season mark en route to the division title and an appearance in the NFC Championship.

Harlan fittingly was honored July 17, 2004, with his induction into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame. His mark on the franchise earlier was recognized Sept. 2, 2003, with the dedication of the Robert E. Harlan Plaza, in front of the main entrance to Lambeau Field. It is marked by a plaque featured between the statues of team founder Curly Lambeau and Hall of Fame coach Vince Lombardi.

Other notable achievements include the 1994 decision to leave Milwaukee, ending a 62-year stay, and play all home games in Green Bay; launching the fourth stock sale in the team's history in 1997, a mechanism which produced more than $20 million in "new money" and in excess of 100,000 new shareholders; and authorizing construction of the Don Hutson Center, the team's "state of the art" indoor practice facility.

Under Harlan, the organization also has been accorded national acclaim for its consistently high quality of operation. Additionally, the team ranked among the league's most popular the last several years and merchandise sales consistently land in the NFL's top five.

The affable Iowan, who was involved in every area of the club's operations over the course of his three-plus decade career, joined the organization as assistant general manager on June 1, 1971, after serving as director of public relations for the St. Louis baseball Cardinals. He earlier earned a B.S. degree in journalism from Marquette in 1958 and had a brief tour of duty in the U.S. Army before spending six months as a general reporter for United Press International in Milwaukee. He subsequently became sports information director at Marquette in 1959, then joined the Cardinals in 1965, acting as director of community relations and the speakers' bureau for two years and as director of public relations for three-and-a-half years before joining the Packers.

Harlan currently serves on the board of directors for a number of community organizations and has been the recipient of multiple honors, both on a local and state basis, including being honored three times by his alma mater, Marquette University, in 1997. In 2007, he penned his autobiography, Green and Golden Moments: Bob Harlan and the Green Bay Packers.

Born Robert Ernest Harlan in Des Moines, Iowa, he and his wife, Madeline, have three sons, Kevin, Bryan, and Michael, plus four grandchildren.