Front Office

Rob Davis
Director of Player Engagement

Biography

Rob Davis, who played 12 years in the NFL, enters his ninth year as the team’s director of player engagement. Before being named to the new position, he had spent the previous 11 seasons as the Packers’ long snapper before retiring in March 2008. He was named director of player development on March 26, 2008, by Ted Thompson, Executive Vice President, General Manager and Director of Football Operations. Davis’ title was adjusted to director of player engagement in 2014.

As the director of player engagement, Davis is vital in maintaining locker-room cohesiveness and overall player health. He assists players in acclimating to their roles, both on and off the field and in the Green Bay community.

Davis also oversees the Packers’ wide range of programs designed to meet the needs of players and their families in today’s NFL. The department provides a framework of assistance within which players and their immediate family members can address the pressures created by daily life and complicated by the demands of playing professional football. The program is also set up to get players prepared for life after football, and helps players seek educational and vocational opportunities. Davis also developed a mentorship program, aimed at joining Packers players with community leaders who serve as professional mentors.

Davis served as the Packers’ long snapper for 11 seasons (1997-2007) and played 167 straight games in a Green Bay uniform, the third-longest streak in team history. Only Brett Favre (255) and Forrest Gregg (187) played in more consecutive games for the Packers than Davis.

Davis worked three years for an opportunity to play in the NFL, spending two training camps with the N.Y. Jets (1993-94), a year with the CFL’s Baltimore Stallions (1995) and a preseason with the Kansas City Chiefs (1996). In 1996, Davis signed with Chicago and played all 16 games as the team’s long snapper. Released by the Bears near the end of the ’97 training camp, he signed with Green Bay in November and handled all long-snapping duties for the last seven regular-season games, as well as all three playoff contests, including Super Bowl XXXII.

The 47-year-old Davis was named the Packers’ player representative in 2005, which entails being a liaison between the players and the union and relaying proper information to the players regarding rights and benefits. Prior to 2005, he was an alternate player representative for five seasons.

Davis became the first player ever from Shippensburg (Pa.) University to play in the NFL and was named to the school’s athletic hall of fame in October 2003.  Accompanying his induction, he also became the first player to have his jersey retired by Shippensburg in any sport.

Davis resides in De Pere with his wife, Tara, his daughter, Marlee, 12, and his son, Kahli, 9.

Several years ago, he developed a program for at-risk youth called The Culture (Care, Understanding, Loyalty, Toughness, Utilization, Respect, Education). The program works with area school districts and their at-risk students through hands-on programs customized for the students with the assistance of the schools.

Rob Davis, who played 12 years in the NFL, enters his ninth year as the team’s director of player engagement. Before being named to the new position, he had spent the previous 11 seasons as the Packers’ long snapper before retiring in March 2008. He was named director of player development on March 26, 2008, by Ted Thompson, Executive Vice President, General Manager and Director of Football Operations. Davis’ title was adjusted to director of player engagement in 2014.

As the director of player engagement, Davis is vital in maintaining locker-room cohesiveness and overall player health. He assists players in acclimating to their roles, both on and off the field and in the Green Bay community.

Davis also oversees the Packers’ wide range of programs designed to meet the needs of players and their families in today’s NFL. The department provides a framework of assistance within which players and their immediate family members can address the pressures created by daily life and complicated by the demands of playing professional football. The program is also set up to get players prepared for life after football, and helps players seek educational and vocational opportunities. Davis also developed a mentorship program, aimed at joining Packers players with community leaders who serve as professional mentors.

Davis served as the Packers’ long snapper for 11 seasons (1997-2007) and played 167 straight games in a Green Bay uniform, the third-longest streak in team history. Only Brett Favre (255) and Forrest Gregg (187) played in more consecutive games for the Packers than Davis.

Davis worked three years for an opportunity to play in the NFL, spending two training camps with the N.Y. Jets (1993-94), a year with the CFL’s Baltimore Stallions (1995) and a preseason with the Kansas City Chiefs (1996). In 1996, Davis signed with Chicago and played all 16 games as the team’s long snapper. Released by the Bears near the end of the ’97 training camp, he signed with Green Bay in November and handled all long-snapping duties for the last seven regular-season games, as well as all three playoff contests, including Super Bowl XXXII.

The 47-year-old Davis was named the Packers’ player representative in 2005, which entails being a liaison between the players and the union and relaying proper information to the players regarding rights and benefits. Prior to 2005, he was an alternate player representative for five seasons.

Davis became the first player ever from Shippensburg (Pa.) University to play in the NFL and was named to the school’s athletic hall of fame in October 2003.  Accompanying his induction, he also became the first player to have his jersey retired by Shippensburg in any sport.

Davis resides in De Pere with his wife, Tara, his daughter, Marlee, 12, and his son, Kahli, 9.

Several years ago, he developed a program for at-risk youth called The Culture (Care, Understanding, Loyalty, Toughness, Utilization, Respect, Education). The program works with area school districts and their at-risk students through hands-on programs customized for the students with the assistance of the schools.