On Now
Coming Up
  • Tue., Sep. 01, 2015 12:15 PM - 2:15 PM CDT *Public practice *Any practices moved inside to the Don Hutson Center due to inclement weather, poor field conditions or for any other reason will be closed to the public due to space limitations. All other practices listed are expected to be open unless listed otherwise. All outdoor practices are expected to be held on Ray Nitschke Field (across from the Resch Center). All times indicated are Central.
  • Wed., Sep. 02, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM CDT Gilbert Brown Appearance

    Gilbert Brown

    Wednesday, September 2, 2015 4:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m.

    Sargento-Meijer's appearance

    Oak Creek, WI
  • Thu., Sep. 03, 2015 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM CDT Gerry Ellis and Tony Fisher appearance

    Gerry Ellis and Tony Fisher appearance

    Thursday, September 3, 2015 3:30 - 5pm

    Green Bay Packers Bishop’s Charities Game

    Meet and Greet Autograph Table

    Oneida Nation Gate, Lambeau Field

  • Thu., Sep. 03, 2015 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM CDT Packers vs. New Orleans Saints (Bishop's Charities Game) Packers vs. New Orleans Saints (Bishop's Charities Game)
  • Wed., Sep. 09, 2015 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM CDT Bill Schroeder appearance at NWTC

    Bill Schroeder appearance at NWTC

    Wednesday, September 9, 2015

    11:30 am- 12:30 pm

    NWTC Green Bay Campus- Welcome Center SC240

  • Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM CDT Packers at Chicago Bears Packers at Chicago Bears

Front Office

Ted Thompson
General Manager

Biography

Ted Thompson firmly believes that the best way to build a successful team is by drafting and developing players, with free agency playing a complementary role in addressing specific needs.

Now 10-plus years into his tenure as Executive Vice President, General Manager and Director of Football Operations, Thompson’s philosophy was validated in 2010 with a win in Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers, Green Bay’s fourth Super Bowl title and 13th world championship.

A look at the Packers’ roster for Super Bowl XLV indicates a team truly built by Thompson. Nineteen of 22 starters and 49 of 53 players on the roster were acquired by Thompson via the draft, free agency, trades or the waiver wire during his time in Green Bay.

Thompson’s approach was reaffirmed the past four seasons (2011-14) as Green Bay added to one of its most successful stretches in team history. While the Packers came up short in their quest to win another Super Bowl championship, Green Bay finished with a franchise-best 15 regular-season wins in 2011 while also capturing four consecutive division titles from 2011-14. It marked the first time since the league went to a divisional format in 1967 that the Packers won four straight division titles, making the Packers the only NFC team to win its division each of the last four seasons and one of only three teams in the NFL to do so over that span (Denver, New England). The 2014 season also marked Green Bay’s sixth straight playoff appearance and seventh in the last eight seasons, making them the only NFC team to accomplish those feats.

The Packers’ success under Thompson has been due, in part, to the immediate contribution of Thompson’s draft picks and non-drafted free agents. The 2014 draft class combined for 42 starts in the regular season, good for the fifth-most combined starts among all NFL teams’ 2014 draft classes. Overall, the Packers rank first in games played by rookies since 2005 (1,189) and tied for seventh in starts by rookies (314). Also since 2005, 21 rookie free agents have made the opening-day roster under Thompson. More impressively, 15 non-drafted rookies have made the opening-day roster in the past five seasons (2010-14), tying the Packers for fifth most in the NFL over that span.

Highlighting last season’s draft class were first-round selection S Ha Ha Clinton-Dix of Alabama and fifth-round selection C Corey Linsley of Ohio State, as both earned PFWA All-Rookie Team honors after each appeared in all 16 games with a combined 26 starts. Second-round selection WR Davante Adams of Fresno State and third-round pick TE Richard Rodgers of California also had an impact, ranking third and sixth on the team, respectively, in receiving yards. 

The 2014 season also saw seven Packers named to the Pro Bowl; WR Randall Cobb, FB John Kuhn, LB Clay Matthews, WR Jordy Nelson, QB Aaron Rodgers, CB Sam Shields and G Josh Sitton. It marked the first appearances for Cobb, Nelson and Shields in the annual all-star game. For Rodgers, Thompson’s first draft selection as Green Bay’s GM in 2005, it marked his fourth selection. He was also named The Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player for the second time in his career (also 2011) to go along with his MVP honors for Super Bowl XLV. A first-round selection by Thompson in 2009, it marked Matthews’ fifth appearance in the Pro Bowl. In 2012, he became the first Packer to earn Pro Bowl recognition in each of his first four seasons (2009-12) in the NFL. Sitton’s second appearance in the NFL all-star game in ’14 elevated his status to one of the NFL’s elite offensive lineman as Thompson’s fourth-round selection in 2008 has also been named second-team All-Pro by AP the past two seasons (2013-14). Combining the drafts he has run in Seattle and Green Bay, 27 of Thompson’s selections have earned Pro Bowl, All-Pro or All-Rookie honors, and since Thompson joined Green Bay in 2005, the Packers have drafted 10 players that have made at least one Pro Bowl appearance, ranking the Packers fourth in the NFL in that category.

The 2013 draft class had a similar immediate impact on the Packers’ success. Second-round pick RB Eddie Lacy was named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year and second-team All-Pro by AP, NFL Rookie of the Year by the PFWA, and was selected to the Pro Bowl. Lacy finished the season with 1,178 rushing yards, the most in in franchise history by a rookie. His rushing total led all NFL rookies and ranked No. 8 among all players, while his 11 rushing TDs ranked third in the NFL and set a new franchise record for most rushing TDs by a rookie. Lacy followed up his rookie campaign with 1,139 rushing yards in 2014 to become the fifth player in franchise history to record consecutive 1,000-yard rushing seasons. The 2013 draft also produced T David Bakhtiari (fourth round), the only rookie in the NFL to start at the all-important left tackle position in every game during the 2013 season.

Despite coming off a world championship in 2010 and featuring one of the deepest rosters in the league, the Packers received consistent contributions from Thompson’s 2011 draft class in their rookie seasons. Second-round pick Cobb made an immediate impact in his pro debut vs. New Orleans with a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown that matched the NFL record at the time. He finished the season ranked No. 2 in the NFL (No. 1 among rookies) with a 27.7-yard kickoff return average and No. 7 in the league (No. 2 among rookies) with an 11.3-yard punt return average. For his efforts, Cobb was named to the Pro Football Weekly All-Rookie team as the kick returner. Cobb continued to excel in 2012, setting a franchise record with a league-leading 2,342 combined net yards. Additionally, Cobb paced the team with 80 receptions and 954 receiving yards in his second season.

The combined achievements authored by the 2010 and ’11 teams assembled by Thompson have a prominent place in Packers and NFL history. Covering a span of 364 days, Green Bay won 19 consecutive games (including postseason) over the two seasons. The 19-game winning streak began in Week 16 of 2010 and lasted until Green Bay suffered its lone regular-season defeat at Kansas City in Week 15 of the 2011 season. The streak was the longest in franchise history and was the second-longest winning streak in NFL history (including playoffs) behind only the 2003-04 New England Patriots (21 games). Perhaps most impressively, the Packers never trailed in the fourth quarter during their 19-game winning streak.

The 2011 Packers captured their second NFC North title under Thompson and first since 2007, and as a result, earned the NFC’s No. 1 seed for the first time since 1996. Green Bay finished the 2011 campaign with a perfect 8-0 record at Lambeau Field for the first time since 2002.

Seven of Thompson’s players were selected to the Pro Bowl following the 2011 campaign, the most the Packers had voted to the all-star game since 1967. The selections included WR Greg Jennings, Kuhn, Matthews, NT B.J. Raji, Rodgers, C Scott Wells and CB Charles Woodson. Six of the selections were acquired by Thompson as Jennings, Matthews, Raji and Rodgers were draft picks while Kuhn was claimed off waivers and Woodson was signed as a free agent. It was the fourth straight Pro Bowl selection for Woodson, the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2009 who was signed by Thompson in 2006.

In 2010, the Packers posted a 10-6 mark and qualified for the postseason for the third time under Thompson. Winners of three straight playoff games on the road, Green Bay became just the second No. 6 seed (2005 Steelers) to win a Super Bowl since the NFL went to a 12-team playoff format in 1990.

The Packers featured eight Pro Bowl selections in 2010, with five of the players being voted to the initial squad. Four of the eight players were draft picks of Thompson’s and two more were signed as free agents.

What made the Packers’ championship season in 2010 even more notable was the adversity the team faced due to injuries. Green Bay finished the year with 15 players on injured reserve, and eight of them had started at least one game on the season. Six starters from the opening-day depth chart sustained season-ending injuries in the first seven games.

Because of those injuries, the roster depth that Thompson had built during his tenure came to the fore. Rookies such as T Bryan Bulaga, a first-round draft pick in 2010, and Shields and LB Frank Zombo, both non-drafted free agents in ’10, were called upon to step into prominent roles. A pair of fourth-year players, LB Desmond Bishop and S Charlie Peprah, moved into the starting lineup and became key cogs on defense after contributing primarily on special teams earlier in their careers. RB James Starks, a sixth-round pick in 2010 who was limited to just three games during the regular season because of an injury, led the NFL with 315 rushing yards in the postseason, third most in league annals by a rookie RB in the playoffs.

The Packers’ Super Bowl XLV team was a direct reflection of the philosophy that Thompson has held true to throughout his Green Bay tenure, one that should put the franchise in good position to contend for championships on an annual basis. Since taking over as GM, Thompson has focused on rebuilding and improving the bulk of the roster, mostly through the draft.

In his first four drafts from 2005-08, Thompson utilized 14 trades, all but one of them down, to turn 31 picks into 43 selections, plus an extra choice in ’09. In 2009-10, however, his trades went in the other direction as the improved roster core allowed him to focus less on the overall quantity of picks. Those two years, Thompson traded up for specific players he had targeted in certain rounds.

In ’09, after selecting Raji out of Boston College with the No. 9 overall selection in the first round, Thompson traded a second-round pick and two third-round selections – Nos. 41, 73 and 83 overall – to New England to get another crack at a first-round talent. He moved up 15 spots to No. 26 overall and nabbed Matthews out of Southern California, while also receiving a 2009 fifth-round pick in return from the Patriots.

Just like that, not only did Thompson give the Packers two first-round draft choices for the first time in 16 years, he added highly touted prospects at the two linchpin positions in the 3-4 defense – a middle anchor and an outside pass rusher.

Thompson followed in the footsteps of his mentor, Ron Wolf, in becoming Green Bay’s GM, and in 2008 he joined Wolf in becoming the only people in the history of the organization to be recognized as the best in their field in a vote of their peers as the NFL Executive of the Year by Sporting News. He further cemented his reputation in the NFL by winning the award for a second time following the Packers’ record-setting 2011 season.

Preceding his first award, Thompson left an undeniable stamp on Green Bay’s successful 2007 season. In just his third campaign as GM, he assembled a roster that was the youngest yet one of the most talented in the NFL, and the Packers went 13-3, won the NFC North Division title, and advanced to the NFC Championship Game for the first time in a decade.

“I’m honored to receive this award on behalf of the Green Bay Packers,” the humble Thompson said in 2008. “We view this as a team honor and feel the coaches, players and staff should all be very proud of the job they’ve done in helping this franchise succeed.”

The prestigious award acknowledged Thompson for his diligence and success as the team came within an overtime field goal of advancing to the Super Bowl. But it also served as recognition for Thompson’s overall body of work since taking his current position in 2005.

One of the biggest additions to the playoff-bound team came from a key trade. Thompson acquired RB Ryan Grant from the New York Giants at the end of training camp for a sixth-round draft choice, adding the former Notre Dame standout to a crowded but banged-up backfield.

Grant eventually took over as the feature back midway through the season and proceeded to rush for nearly 1,000 yards, adding 201 yards and three TDs in the NFC Divisional playoff victory over Seattle, both Green Bay postseason records. He went on to add back-to-back 1,200-yard campaigns in 2008-09.

Surprising many with the hiring of Mike McCarthy as head coach in January 2006, Thompson embarked on turning around a 4-12 team beset by injuries and salary-cap concerns in his first season. The improvement to an 8-8 mark in 2006, followed by the playoff run in 2007, netted McCarthy the Motorola NFL Coach of the Year award and placed both Thompson and his chief hire at the top of their professions.

Thompson’s career as a football executive came full circle Jan. 14, 2005. That day, former Green Bay Packers CEO Bob Harlan gave him full authority over all aspects of football operations for the storied franchise.

In becoming the 10th general manager in club history, Thompson rejoined the team with which he received his start under Wolf in 1992. After working for the legendary general manager through the 1999 season, Thompson spent five years as vice president of football operations for the Seattle Seahawks.

“It’s almost a dream-come-true-type job,” Thompson said. “You think about, when you’re a young kid, some of the things you’d like to do when you grow up and you think maybe manager of the New York Yankees or maybe the general manager of the Green Bay Packers. So it’s a thrill, it’s an honor.”

For Harlan, the selection of Thompson to lead Green Bay’s football fortunes was an easy choice, and Thompson has validated that confidence in his selection by successfully remaking the roster into one he and the organization believe is built for long-term success.

“I feel Ted is a perfect fit for the Packers,” Harlan said, introducing Thompson in 2005. “He is a respected National Football League veteran who is a proven talent evaluator and an efficient administrator. He knows the people in our personnel department and he is familiar with how we run our football operation. He embraces the Packers’ championship tradition, and he was very anxious to have the opportunity to return to Green Bay.”

Now in his 34th NFL season, including 10 years as a player, Thompson knows and respects the position the Packers hold in the hearts of the fans, and around the league.

“The history and tradition of this place is unrivaled in professional sports,” Thompson said. “I understand the passion the people here have for their team. Ron (Wolf) told me this is the best job in the National Football League. I never forgot that.”

The 62-year-old Thompson not only joined an organization with which he was familiar, but also oversees a respected staff that includes Eliot Wolf, director of player personnel, Brian Gutekunst, director of college scouting, and Alonzo Highsmith, senior personnel executive.

Former Thompson staffers include current Kansas City Chiefs general manager John Dorsey, Oakland Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie, Raiders director-college scouting Shaun Herock and Seattle Seahawks executive vice president/general manager John Schneider.

Almost immediately upon taking over, Thompson made a crucial choice for the long-term benefit of the club. In the 2005 NFL Draft, Rodgers had been projected as high as the No. 1 overall pick, but he wasn’t taken there and ended up sliding all the way down to the Packers at No. 24. One year later, Thompson handed Rodgers to an accomplished quarterback mentor in McCarthy to mold him into the team’s signal caller of the future.

In 2008-09, following the retirement and subsequent trade of Brett Favre, Rodgers became the first quarterback in league history to eclipse 4,000 yards passing in each of his first two seasons as a starter. Rodgers surpassed the 4,000-yard mark again in 2011 and 2012 and posted 21,332 passing yards from 2008-12. That total ranks first in NFL history for the most passing yards by a QB in his first five seasons as a starter, surpassing the previous mark held by Peyton Manning (20,618, 1998-2002). Rodgers’ career passer rating of 106.0 ranks No. 1 in NFL history, and his 122.5 passer rating in 2011 set a single-season NFL record, topping Manning’s 121.1 mark in 2004. Additionally, Rodgers’ 1.64 career interception percentage is tops in NFL history.

Although Thompson prefers to shift the spotlight in another direction, his fingerprints were also all over the Seahawks’ road to Super Bowl XL during the 2005 season. League MVP Shaun Alexander, Thompson’s first draft pick in Seattle, captured the 2005 league rushing title and established a then-single-season NFL record with 28 TDs. Nine of Seattle’s Super Bowl starters, as well as K Josh Brown, were drafted by Thompson. That list included G Steve Hutchinson, a Pro Bowler in seven of his 12 NFL seasons.

Thompson’s philosophy on building a successful team relies heavily on drafted players as a foundation. In today’s NFL, teams can’t win consistently with free agency as their primary tool. And in building through the draft, the Packers place a premium on character.

But despite how much value he places on the draft, Thompson also will use the free-agent market as another tool to build the roster. In Green Bay, he has brought in players like Woodson, DT Ryan Pickett and most recently LB Julius Peppers, among others, to either take over starting jobs or provide valuable, experienced depth at their positions.

“I think free agency is a very interesting tool to use to help you patch some holes and do some things,” said Thompson, who signed five unrestricted free agents in 2006, the Packers’ most since 1998. “There’s no reluctance on our part. We do try to make certain that what we do is not just fantasy football. We’re investing in a player that’s got to come in and play a particular role. If we don’t think that player can perform to that contract, then it doesn’t make sense for us to do it just to say, ‘Look what we’ve spent.’”

In Green Bay annals, Thompson is only the fourth general manager to serve exclusively from the front office, joining Verne Lewellen (1954-58), Vince Lombardi (1968) and Wolf (1992-2000).

The low-profile Thompson has a proven track record as an evaluator. Overseeing Seattle’s draft board from 2000 through ’04, Thompson provided the Seahawks a solid foundation which they used to make three straight playoff appearances (2003-05). His 2003 draft saw Thompson land three players – Brown, CB Marcus Trufant and S Ken Hamlin – who not only made immediate front-line contributions as rookies, but who also became cornerstone players for years to come.

Just one year later, those three were instrumental in Seattle’s 2004 NFC West championship. In the Seahawks’ playoff game that year, 11 of 22 starters were acquired through Thompson’s drafts. In his first two Green Bay drafts, Thompson selected S Nick Collins in 2005 and LB A.J. Hawk, Jennings and G Daryn Colledge in 2006. All four were named to the Pro Football Weekly All-Rookie team. In ’07, he drafted K Mason Crosby, whose 1,037 career points from 2007-14 were the most in NFL history by a player in his first eight seasons.

Prior to 2009, Thompson selected 43 players in his first four drafts as GM, signaling the rebuilding of the roster core that had seen only 27 draft picks in the four years (2001-04) before Thompson returned to Green Bay.

As a result, offseason competition for positions on Green Bay’s 53-man roster has been fierce since Thompson took over. The goal is to improve the team’s play through competition, just as it was when Bum Phillips annually brought in younger talent to try to take Thompson’s job during the former linebacker’s 10-year playing career with the Houston Oilers.

A former Oilers teammate, Mike Reinfeldt, helped to launch Thompson’s second football career. In 1992, Reinfeldt, then the Packers’ vice president of administration, recommended that Wolf take a look at Thompson as a potential pro scout for his staff. Wolf subsequently brought Thompson in to audition as a personnel evaluator, and Thompson always has felt he learned a lot from Wolf.

“He taught me passion, he taught me work ethic, he taught me believing in yourself, to have confidence, to write down what you see, not what other people see, and to trust yourself.”

During his first tenure in Green Bay, Thompson was instrumental in providing talent that produced an 83-45 record (.648), six straight playoff berths, two Super Bowl appearances and the 1996 world championship. With his help, the team acquired free agents Reggie White, Sean Jones, Don Beebe, Santana Dotson and Desmond Howard. Through the draft, Green Bay added Vonnie Holliday and Donald Driver, the Packers’ all-time leading receiver.

A possessor of strong football credentials and keen knowledge of the game gleaned from his decade-long playing career, Thompson credits Wolf with deepening his understanding of the scouting process and cites his experience in Seattle working with Mike Holmgren as very valuable in terms of his growth as a football person, running an organization and making decisions that affect the team in the present and in the future.

A versatile linebacker during his 10-year NFL playing career with the Oilers (1975-84), Thompson also was one of the most durable players in team annals, missing just one of 147 contests due to injury. He started eight games over the course of his career and also played in seven postseason contests (1978-80), with the Oilers going 4-3 in those games, losing the AFC Championship to the Steelers in both 1978 and ’79. He originally was signed by Phillips as a non-drafted free agent.

Thompson’s Oilers teammates included Pro Football Hall of Famers Earl Campbell, Mike Munchak, Elvin Bethea, Warren Moon and Bruce Matthews (current Packer Clay’s uncle). Thompson also served as a reserve kicker and converted all four PATs he attempted in an emergency situation vs. the New York Jets in a 1981 contest.

Collegiately, Thompson was a three-year starter (1972-74) at linebacker and team captain (’74) for SMU. As a sophomore, he played under head coach Hayden Fry, and Phillips, his eventual pro coach, was defensive coordinator. He also served as the team’s placekicker as a senior. Following his football career, in the spring of ’75, he lettered as an outfielder for the Mustangs’ baseball team. Thompson gained Academic All-Southwest Conference honors and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

Born Jan. 17, 1953, in Atlanta, Texas, Thompson was an all-region player at the city’s high school, lining up at running back, linebacker and placekicker. He also lettered in basketball, baseball, track and golf. He is single and enjoys an occasional round of golf in times of leisure.

Ted Thompson firmly believes that the best way to build a successful team is by drafting and developing players, with free agency playing a complementary role in addressing specific needs.

Now 10-plus years into his tenure as Executive Vice President, General Manager and Director of Football Operations, Thompson’s philosophy was validated in 2010 with a win in Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers, Green Bay’s fourth Super Bowl title and 13th world championship.

A look at the Packers’ roster for Super Bowl XLV indicates a team truly built by Thompson. Nineteen of 22 starters and 49 of 53 players on the roster were acquired by Thompson via the draft, free agency, trades or the waiver wire during his time in Green Bay.

Thompson’s approach was reaffirmed the past four seasons (2011-14) as Green Bay added to one of its most successful stretches in team history. While the Packers came up short in their quest to win another Super Bowl championship, Green Bay finished with a franchise-best 15 regular-season wins in 2011 while also capturing four consecutive division titles from 2011-14. It marked the first time since the league went to a divisional format in 1967 that the Packers won four straight division titles, making the Packers the only NFC team to win its division each of the last four seasons and one of only three teams in the NFL to do so over that span (Denver, New England). The 2014 season also marked Green Bay’s sixth straight playoff appearance and seventh in the last eight seasons, making them the only NFC team to accomplish those feats.

The Packers’ success under Thompson has been due, in part, to the immediate contribution of Thompson’s draft picks and non-drafted free agents. The 2014 draft class combined for 42 starts in the regular season, good for the fifth-most combined starts among all NFL teams’ 2014 draft classes. Overall, the Packers rank first in games played by rookies since 2005 (1,189) and tied for seventh in starts by rookies (314). Also since 2005, 21 rookie free agents have made the opening-day roster under Thompson. More impressively, 15 non-drafted rookies have made the opening-day roster in the past five seasons (2010-14), tying the Packers for fifth most in the NFL over that span.

Highlighting last season’s draft class were first-round selection S Ha Ha Clinton-Dix of Alabama and fifth-round selection C Corey Linsley of Ohio State, as both earned PFWA All-Rookie Team honors after each appeared in all 16 games with a combined 26 starts. Second-round selection WR Davante Adams of Fresno State and third-round pick TE Richard Rodgers of California also had an impact, ranking third and sixth on the team, respectively, in receiving yards. 

The 2014 season also saw seven Packers named to the Pro Bowl; WR Randall Cobb, FB John Kuhn, LB Clay Matthews, WR Jordy Nelson, QB Aaron Rodgers, CB Sam Shields and G Josh Sitton. It marked the first appearances for Cobb, Nelson and Shields in the annual all-star game. For Rodgers, Thompson’s first draft selection as Green Bay’s GM in 2005, it marked his fourth selection. He was also named The Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player for the second time in his career (also 2011) to go along with his MVP honors for Super Bowl XLV. A first-round selection by Thompson in 2009, it marked Matthews’ fifth appearance in the Pro Bowl. In 2012, he became the first Packer to earn Pro Bowl recognition in each of his first four seasons (2009-12) in the NFL. Sitton’s second appearance in the NFL all-star game in ’14 elevated his status to one of the NFL’s elite offensive lineman as Thompson’s fourth-round selection in 2008 has also been named second-team All-Pro by AP the past two seasons (2013-14). Combining the drafts he has run in Seattle and Green Bay, 27 of Thompson’s selections have earned Pro Bowl, All-Pro or All-Rookie honors, and since Thompson joined Green Bay in 2005, the Packers have drafted 10 players that have made at least one Pro Bowl appearance, ranking the Packers fourth in the NFL in that category.

The 2013 draft class had a similar immediate impact on the Packers’ success. Second-round pick RB Eddie Lacy was named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year and second-team All-Pro by AP, NFL Rookie of the Year by the PFWA, and was selected to the Pro Bowl. Lacy finished the season with 1,178 rushing yards, the most in in franchise history by a rookie. His rushing total led all NFL rookies and ranked No. 8 among all players, while his 11 rushing TDs ranked third in the NFL and set a new franchise record for most rushing TDs by a rookie. Lacy followed up his rookie campaign with 1,139 rushing yards in 2014 to become the fifth player in franchise history to record consecutive 1,000-yard rushing seasons. The 2013 draft also produced T David Bakhtiari (fourth round), the only rookie in the NFL to start at the all-important left tackle position in every game during the 2013 season.

Despite coming off a world championship in 2010 and featuring one of the deepest rosters in the league, the Packers received consistent contributions from Thompson’s 2011 draft class in their rookie seasons. Second-round pick Cobb made an immediate impact in his pro debut vs. New Orleans with a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown that matched the NFL record at the time. He finished the season ranked No. 2 in the NFL (No. 1 among rookies) with a 27.7-yard kickoff return average and No. 7 in the league (No. 2 among rookies) with an 11.3-yard punt return average. For his efforts, Cobb was named to the Pro Football Weekly All-Rookie team as the kick returner. Cobb continued to excel in 2012, setting a franchise record with a league-leading 2,342 combined net yards. Additionally, Cobb paced the team with 80 receptions and 954 receiving yards in his second season.

The combined achievements authored by the 2010 and ’11 teams assembled by Thompson have a prominent place in Packers and NFL history. Covering a span of 364 days, Green Bay won 19 consecutive games (including postseason) over the two seasons. The 19-game winning streak began in Week 16 of 2010 and lasted until Green Bay suffered its lone regular-season defeat at Kansas City in Week 15 of the 2011 season. The streak was the longest in franchise history and was the second-longest winning streak in NFL history (including playoffs) behind only the 2003-04 New England Patriots (21 games). Perhaps most impressively, the Packers never trailed in the fourth quarter during their 19-game winning streak.

The 2011 Packers captured their second NFC North title under Thompson and first since 2007, and as a result, earned the NFC’s No. 1 seed for the first time since 1996. Green Bay finished the 2011 campaign with a perfect 8-0 record at Lambeau Field for the first time since 2002.

Seven of Thompson’s players were selected to the Pro Bowl following the 2011 campaign, the most the Packers had voted to the all-star game since 1967. The selections included WR Greg Jennings, Kuhn, Matthews, NT B.J. Raji, Rodgers, C Scott Wells and CB Charles Woodson. Six of the selections were acquired by Thompson as Jennings, Matthews, Raji and Rodgers were draft picks while Kuhn was claimed off waivers and Woodson was signed as a free agent. It was the fourth straight Pro Bowl selection for Woodson, the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2009 who was signed by Thompson in 2006.

In 2010, the Packers posted a 10-6 mark and qualified for the postseason for the third time under Thompson. Winners of three straight playoff games on the road, Green Bay became just the second No. 6 seed (2005 Steelers) to win a Super Bowl since the NFL went to a 12-team playoff format in 1990.

The Packers featured eight Pro Bowl selections in 2010, with five of the players being voted to the initial squad. Four of the eight players were draft picks of Thompson’s and two more were signed as free agents.

What made the Packers’ championship season in 2010 even more notable was the adversity the team faced due to injuries. Green Bay finished the year with 15 players on injured reserve, and eight of them had started at least one game on the season. Six starters from the opening-day depth chart sustained season-ending injuries in the first seven games.

Because of those injuries, the roster depth that Thompson had built during his tenure came to the fore. Rookies such as T Bryan Bulaga, a first-round draft pick in 2010, and Shields and LB Frank Zombo, both non-drafted free agents in ’10, were called upon to step into prominent roles. A pair of fourth-year players, LB Desmond Bishop and S Charlie Peprah, moved into the starting lineup and became key cogs on defense after contributing primarily on special teams earlier in their careers. RB James Starks, a sixth-round pick in 2010 who was limited to just three games during the regular season because of an injury, led the NFL with 315 rushing yards in the postseason, third most in league annals by a rookie RB in the playoffs.

The Packers’ Super Bowl XLV team was a direct reflection of the philosophy that Thompson has held true to throughout his Green Bay tenure, one that should put the franchise in good position to contend for championships on an annual basis. Since taking over as GM, Thompson has focused on rebuilding and improving the bulk of the roster, mostly through the draft.

In his first four drafts from 2005-08, Thompson utilized 14 trades, all but one of them down, to turn 31 picks into 43 selections, plus an extra choice in ’09. In 2009-10, however, his trades went in the other direction as the improved roster core allowed him to focus less on the overall quantity of picks. Those two years, Thompson traded up for specific players he had targeted in certain rounds.

In ’09, after selecting Raji out of Boston College with the No. 9 overall selection in the first round, Thompson traded a second-round pick and two third-round selections – Nos. 41, 73 and 83 overall – to New England to get another crack at a first-round talent. He moved up 15 spots to No. 26 overall and nabbed Matthews out of Southern California, while also receiving a 2009 fifth-round pick in return from the Patriots.

Just like that, not only did Thompson give the Packers two first-round draft choices for the first time in 16 years, he added highly touted prospects at the two linchpin positions in the 3-4 defense – a middle anchor and an outside pass rusher.

Thompson followed in the footsteps of his mentor, Ron Wolf, in becoming Green Bay’s GM, and in 2008 he joined Wolf in becoming the only people in the history of the organization to be recognized as the best in their field in a vote of their peers as the NFL Executive of the Year by Sporting News. He further cemented his reputation in the NFL by winning the award for a second time following the Packers’ record-setting 2011 season.

Preceding his first award, Thompson left an undeniable stamp on Green Bay’s successful 2007 season. In just his third campaign as GM, he assembled a roster that was the youngest yet one of the most talented in the NFL, and the Packers went 13-3, won the NFC North Division title, and advanced to the NFC Championship Game for the first time in a decade.

“I’m honored to receive this award on behalf of the Green Bay Packers,” the humble Thompson said in 2008. “We view this as a team honor and feel the coaches, players and staff should all be very proud of the job they’ve done in helping this franchise succeed.”

The prestigious award acknowledged Thompson for his diligence and success as the team came within an overtime field goal of advancing to the Super Bowl. But it also served as recognition for Thompson’s overall body of work since taking his current position in 2005.

One of the biggest additions to the playoff-bound team came from a key trade. Thompson acquired RB Ryan Grant from the New York Giants at the end of training camp for a sixth-round draft choice, adding the former Notre Dame standout to a crowded but banged-up backfield.

Grant eventually took over as the feature back midway through the season and proceeded to rush for nearly 1,000 yards, adding 201 yards and three TDs in the NFC Divisional playoff victory over Seattle, both Green Bay postseason records. He went on to add back-to-back 1,200-yard campaigns in 2008-09.

Surprising many with the hiring of Mike McCarthy as head coach in January 2006, Thompson embarked on turning around a 4-12 team beset by injuries and salary-cap concerns in his first season. The improvement to an 8-8 mark in 2006, followed by the playoff run in 2007, netted McCarthy the Motorola NFL Coach of the Year award and placed both Thompson and his chief hire at the top of their professions.

Thompson’s career as a football executive came full circle Jan. 14, 2005. That day, former Green Bay Packers CEO Bob Harlan gave him full authority over all aspects of football operations for the storied franchise.

In becoming the 10th general manager in club history, Thompson rejoined the team with which he received his start under Wolf in 1992. After working for the legendary general manager through the 1999 season, Thompson spent five years as vice president of football operations for the Seattle Seahawks.

“It’s almost a dream-come-true-type job,” Thompson said. “You think about, when you’re a young kid, some of the things you’d like to do when you grow up and you think maybe manager of the New York Yankees or maybe the general manager of the Green Bay Packers. So it’s a thrill, it’s an honor.”

For Harlan, the selection of Thompson to lead Green Bay’s football fortunes was an easy choice, and Thompson has validated that confidence in his selection by successfully remaking the roster into one he and the organization believe is built for long-term success.

“I feel Ted is a perfect fit for the Packers,” Harlan said, introducing Thompson in 2005. “He is a respected National Football League veteran who is a proven talent evaluator and an efficient administrator. He knows the people in our personnel department and he is familiar with how we run our football operation. He embraces the Packers’ championship tradition, and he was very anxious to have the opportunity to return to Green Bay.”

Now in his 34th NFL season, including 10 years as a player, Thompson knows and respects the position the Packers hold in the hearts of the fans, and around the league.

“The history and tradition of this place is unrivaled in professional sports,” Thompson said. “I understand the passion the people here have for their team. Ron (Wolf) told me this is the best job in the National Football League. I never forgot that.”

The 62-year-old Thompson not only joined an organization with which he was familiar, but also oversees a respected staff that includes Eliot Wolf, director of player personnel, Brian Gutekunst, director of college scouting, and Alonzo Highsmith, senior personnel executive.

Former Thompson staffers include current Kansas City Chiefs general manager John Dorsey, Oakland Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie, Raiders director-college scouting Shaun Herock and Seattle Seahawks executive vice president/general manager John Schneider.

Almost immediately upon taking over, Thompson made a crucial choice for the long-term benefit of the club. In the 2005 NFL Draft, Rodgers had been projected as high as the No. 1 overall pick, but he wasn’t taken there and ended up sliding all the way down to the Packers at No. 24. One year later, Thompson handed Rodgers to an accomplished quarterback mentor in McCarthy to mold him into the team’s signal caller of the future.

In 2008-09, following the retirement and subsequent trade of Brett Favre, Rodgers became the first quarterback in league history to eclipse 4,000 yards passing in each of his first two seasons as a starter. Rodgers surpassed the 4,000-yard mark again in 2011 and 2012 and posted 21,332 passing yards from 2008-12. That total ranks first in NFL history for the most passing yards by a QB in his first five seasons as a starter, surpassing the previous mark held by Peyton Manning (20,618, 1998-2002). Rodgers’ career passer rating of 106.0 ranks No. 1 in NFL history, and his 122.5 passer rating in 2011 set a single-season NFL record, topping Manning’s 121.1 mark in 2004. Additionally, Rodgers’ 1.64 career interception percentage is tops in NFL history.

Although Thompson prefers to shift the spotlight in another direction, his fingerprints were also all over the Seahawks’ road to Super Bowl XL during the 2005 season. League MVP Shaun Alexander, Thompson’s first draft pick in Seattle, captured the 2005 league rushing title and established a then-single-season NFL record with 28 TDs. Nine of Seattle’s Super Bowl starters, as well as K Josh Brown, were drafted by Thompson. That list included G Steve Hutchinson, a Pro Bowler in seven of his 12 NFL seasons.

Thompson’s philosophy on building a successful team relies heavily on drafted players as a foundation. In today’s NFL, teams can’t win consistently with free agency as their primary tool. And in building through the draft, the Packers place a premium on character.

But despite how much value he places on the draft, Thompson also will use the free-agent market as another tool to build the roster. In Green Bay, he has brought in players like Woodson, DT Ryan Pickett and most recently LB Julius Peppers, among others, to either take over starting jobs or provide valuable, experienced depth at their positions.

“I think free agency is a very interesting tool to use to help you patch some holes and do some things,” said Thompson, who signed five unrestricted free agents in 2006, the Packers’ most since 1998. “There’s no reluctance on our part. We do try to make certain that what we do is not just fantasy football. We’re investing in a player that’s got to come in and play a particular role. If we don’t think that player can perform to that contract, then it doesn’t make sense for us to do it just to say, ‘Look what we’ve spent.’”

In Green Bay annals, Thompson is only the fourth general manager to serve exclusively from the front office, joining Verne Lewellen (1954-58), Vince Lombardi (1968) and Wolf (1992-2000).

The low-profile Thompson has a proven track record as an evaluator. Overseeing Seattle’s draft board from 2000 through ’04, Thompson provided the Seahawks a solid foundation which they used to make three straight playoff appearances (2003-05). His 2003 draft saw Thompson land three players – Brown, CB Marcus Trufant and S Ken Hamlin – who not only made immediate front-line contributions as rookies, but who also became cornerstone players for years to come.

Just one year later, those three were instrumental in Seattle’s 2004 NFC West championship. In the Seahawks’ playoff game that year, 11 of 22 starters were acquired through Thompson’s drafts. In his first two Green Bay drafts, Thompson selected S Nick Collins in 2005 and LB A.J. Hawk, Jennings and G Daryn Colledge in 2006. All four were named to the Pro Football Weekly All-Rookie team. In ’07, he drafted K Mason Crosby, whose 1,037 career points from 2007-14 were the most in NFL history by a player in his first eight seasons.

Prior to 2009, Thompson selected 43 players in his first four drafts as GM, signaling the rebuilding of the roster core that had seen only 27 draft picks in the four years (2001-04) before Thompson returned to Green Bay.

As a result, offseason competition for positions on Green Bay’s 53-man roster has been fierce since Thompson took over. The goal is to improve the team’s play through competition, just as it was when Bum Phillips annually brought in younger talent to try to take Thompson’s job during the former linebacker’s 10-year playing career with the Houston Oilers.

A former Oilers teammate, Mike Reinfeldt, helped to launch Thompson’s second football career. In 1992, Reinfeldt, then the Packers’ vice president of administration, recommended that Wolf take a look at Thompson as a potential pro scout for his staff. Wolf subsequently brought Thompson in to audition as a personnel evaluator, and Thompson always has felt he learned a lot from Wolf.

“He taught me passion, he taught me work ethic, he taught me believing in yourself, to have confidence, to write down what you see, not what other people see, and to trust yourself.”

During his first tenure in Green Bay, Thompson was instrumental in providing talent that produced an 83-45 record (.648), six straight playoff berths, two Super Bowl appearances and the 1996 world championship. With his help, the team acquired free agents Reggie White, Sean Jones, Don Beebe, Santana Dotson and Desmond Howard. Through the draft, Green Bay added Vonnie Holliday and Donald Driver, the Packers’ all-time leading receiver.

A possessor of strong football credentials and keen knowledge of the game gleaned from his decade-long playing career, Thompson credits Wolf with deepening his understanding of the scouting process and cites his experience in Seattle working with Mike Holmgren as very valuable in terms of his growth as a football person, running an organization and making decisions that affect the team in the present and in the future.

A versatile linebacker during his 10-year NFL playing career with the Oilers (1975-84), Thompson also was one of the most durable players in team annals, missing just one of 147 contests due to injury. He started eight games over the course of his career and also played in seven postseason contests (1978-80), with the Oilers going 4-3 in those games, losing the AFC Championship to the Steelers in both 1978 and ’79. He originally was signed by Phillips as a non-drafted free agent.

Thompson’s Oilers teammates included Pro Football Hall of Famers Earl Campbell, Mike Munchak, Elvin Bethea, Warren Moon and Bruce Matthews (current Packer Clay’s uncle). Thompson also served as a reserve kicker and converted all four PATs he attempted in an emergency situation vs. the New York Jets in a 1981 contest.

Collegiately, Thompson was a three-year starter (1972-74) at linebacker and team captain (’74) for SMU. As a sophomore, he played under head coach Hayden Fry, and Phillips, his eventual pro coach, was defensive coordinator. He also served as the team’s placekicker as a senior. Following his football career, in the spring of ’75, he lettered as an outfielder for the Mustangs’ baseball team. Thompson gained Academic All-Southwest Conference honors and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.

Born Jan. 17, 1953, in Atlanta, Texas, Thompson was an all-region player at the city’s high school, lining up at running back, linebacker and placekicker. He also lettered in basketball, baseball, track and golf. He is single and enjoys an occasional round of golf in times of leisure.