Lane Taylor 'determined to make an impact'

Key comments from the Packers' offensive coaches

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G Lane Taylor

GREEN BAY -- The Packers' offensive assistant coaches met with the media via Zoom on Wednesday, an off day for the players, who will return to the practice field on Thursday morning.

Here's a summary of the coaches' key comments.

Offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett

On the live-tackling practice period for the developmental players:

This is a very unique year, not to have preseason games and get that live action. To go out there and tackle and really get hit, we had to figure something out. It's been a really good period for us. They don't know the plays that are coming in right away. They can't study ahead of time. We try to make it as much of a game-like experience as we can. It's been good for all the young guys.

On effectiveness of Aaron Rodgers on play-action in camp practices:

Being the second year together, all of us knowing each other, understanding the system better and understanding Aaron better, everyone is just coming together. It's something we want to do. It makes it hard on the defense to stop the run. We always want to create that. Aaron has really embraced it and he's really enjoying it. It's slowly coming together. There were some struggles last year from a system standpoint, and we're trying to tighten it up every second.

On Jordan Love not cutting it loose yet:

He just needs more time to be able to learn to play. He gets the play call, gets to the line, gets everything, now it's time to play, and instinct should take over, but he's not 100 percent sure all the time. We just have to continue to work with him so he gets that experience.

On simplifying the play-calling language:

We've made it more conceptual, where in some cases we have one word that means one thing, that tells everybody what to do, so everybody can paint pictures in their mind. They know when they hear that one word what we're trying to accomplish. It's allowed us to expand some things within the offense and we have to keep advancing.

Pass-game coordinator/quarterbacks coach Luke Getsy

On Aaron Rodgers looking back at a 10-year-old cut-up and bringing it to practice:

Anytime you can relate something we currently do to something that was done in the past, you get good examples – whether it was a play or footwork or a particular type of action. Anytime you can go back and find of film of yourself – fortunately I was able to be here before and now that system, too – I think that can help anybody.

On getting Jordan Love acclimated to the offense, while coaching Rodgers and Tim Boyle for the second year:

I think there's a lot of benefit from Jordan hearing how those other guys get coached and hearing the explanations of Aaron and Tim. On top of it, the rook's going to need some extra time himself to explain things a little bit in greater detail. Obviously not having practice reps in the offseason puts him a little behind but we were fortunate to do virtual stuff. …The more opportunities (Jordan) gets, he's getting better every single day. The more opportunities he gets, the more his confidence grows.

On how Love is picking up the offense:

He's done a great job. The virtual stuff really enabled us to dive deep into the details of the offense. I think for a new guy who just walked in the building at the end of July, I think he's in a good place mentally. It's the understanding that comes with continuous reps, he just needs as much of that as he can get.

On Boyle:

Anytime you're in Year 2 compared to Year 1, I think his knowledge of the system, he's improved greatly there. Just understanding the play call and relaying the play call has really benefitted him. … I think it's confidence in the offense. When you know what to do, you're going to be more prepared and be able to execute at a high level. I think that's what we're seeing now compared to a year ago or eight months ago.

Running backs coach Ben Sirmans

On AJ Dillon's first impressions:

The biggest thing that has impressed me is his cutting ability, his ability to react and show subtle quickness for a guy his size, which I think is going to benefit him getting in and out of the hole with how fast things close in this league. He just has to adapt to the overall speed of the game and figure out some of the things he can and can't do. In college, guys can break to the outside and make a big play, but in this league everything is about making a read and getting upfield.

On having three top backs:

There's only so many carries that can go around, but when you have at the very least three guys you feel you can depend on … it is reassuring just in case God forbid something happens to one of these guys, you have two others you can depend on and not miss a beat and still be productive on offense.

On comparing and contrasting Jamaal Williams and Dillon:

The biggest similarity is they both have that ability to be physical and go downhill, but just looking at Jamaal, he did a great job throughout the offseason of improving his overall quickness and his ability as a receiver. Those things have shown up big-time so far in camp. Although they didn't throw AJ the ball much at Boston College, I know he had a drop yesterday, but he has pretty good hands. But I would say Jamaal is more fluid as a pass catcher.

On Dexter Williams' two strong runs in the live-tackling period Tuesday:

I was excited because there had been times in camp he was still learning it's important to get upfield and when that seam is there to take it. Earlier in camp he wasn't doing that as much. Yesterday with those two runs, I was excited to see him take it. Bam. He's not thinking as much out there as he did last year. He took care of his business over the offseason.

Offensive line coach Adam Stenavich

On Lane Taylor:

He came in Day 1 once we got back and really looked great. He's been doing a really good job, moving really well. He's determined to make an impact and he's done a really good job so far. … I think he has a little chip on his shoulder from last year. He's not used to missing that much time.

On getting Rick Wagner up to speed while injured:

We sometimes ask the lineman to do different things than they've done previously. It's just a matter of him learning our different fundamentals and techniques and how we do things. Obviously we don't have as many practices as we normally would. It amplifies it even more. I'm excited to get him back soon hopefully and we'll go from there once we gets back.

On getting the three rookie draft picks up to speed:

I want to get them comfortable in a role as far as whatever position they can play. I don't want to throw too much at them. In order for them to help us this year, they need to find a spot and see if they can excel in that. Once they do that, we can move them around to different roles.

On David Bakhtiari's leadership:

He's got a good command about him, confidence. All the guys feed off of him. He does a really good job of helping young guys out and giving the tips for what he sees. The success he has gives him that much more legitimacy with the guys in the room.

Tight ends coach Justin Outten

Having the virtual sessions throughout the summer helped him drastically just to catch up to speed. He was able to see the broad spectrum of things, and once we got with the older guys, we got into more of the details. His notetaking ability, second- and third-level questioning has been benefiting him, as far as being a young pro and learning the ropes. If you're not a meeting guy, you can't be a football player. You have to nail the details before you can step on the field.

On Marcedes Lewis' leadership:

He's got a lot of ability just not on the field and not just in the locker room, he's around everywhere, in the community. Having him around with the young guys, it's a blessing. He was in a different system prior to (GB), and he had to acclimate himself to this as well, and when he hits on something in practice, guys see that. Those guys can absorb as much as they need.

On the young prospects and competition:

What's interesting about this group is they're competing but they're really, really close. It's a close-knit group. I constantly tell these guys they're not just competing with the guy son this roster, but to be the best in the business. If you have a good day and if you think being the best guy in the room that day is all there is, you're kidding yourself. If you want to be the best, you have to outwork the guys on the other 31 teams. The chemistry in that room is unique.

On Robert Tonyan:

Anytime you take a hiccup with an injury, you hit a low point. You want to be out there with your team. It's been exciting to watch him develop over the last six months mentally, and when he came back physically, he did the work in the offseason and he's put himself in a good spot.

You may not have that typical body, you may not have that typical look, but it's just the fit of this offense and how we use him. We're going to use his strengths to help this offense be special. He brings something different, just like Marcedes does. We have to keep putting him in different spots to allow him to be more comfortable and see what he can do.

Wide receivers coach Jason Vrable

On Allen Lazard:

With Allen, he's the type of guy every day he comes in the building, he's going to try to outwork everyone. He's always been kind of overlooked. Even though he set all of Iowa State's school records, people didn't talk about him that much. The confidence has always been there but he's had to prove himself in every building he's walked into. Last year, he was learning a new offense but he's very intelligent.

On best options in the slot:

What kind of last year was Allen went in there and had some success and Davante Adams moved over there at times. We kind of rotated them around. In this offense, we can go outside and inside. Having them two own that position in training camp, they've done a good job there.

On Davante Adams getting double-coverage:

Some teams have those packages. Coach Gray, who's here now, when we watched Minnesota last year, he explained their thought process was stop '17' as much as they could. A majority of coordinators want to stop a No. 1 receiver as much as you can.

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