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Through the Lens: Patience, poses, perfection with Packers photos
Team photographer Evan Siegle shares more of his 2019 favorites
By Evan Siegle May 29, 2020

'Through the Lens' will appear once per week during the offseason. Packers team photographer Evan Siegle deconstructs some of his favorite images from the 2019 season. Each week will offer a new photo line-up of some of his best photos and stories from the past season.

Smith x 2

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Smith x 2

After every sack or turnover that was made by Za'Darius Smith during a game I'd say to myself, "Wait for it."

"It’s a moment you definitely don’t want to miss."

The big reason for that was Smith's creative celebration moves or gestures. It's a moment you definitely don't want to miss. I think my favorite was this double karate kick celebration shot which came after the Smiths sacked Vikings quarterback Kirk Cousins during Week 16 in Minnesota. Za'Darius went on to have 3½ sacks that game. This image was shot with a 400mm lens (ISO = 3200, Aperture = 2.8, Shutter = 1/2500th).

It’s showtime

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It's showtime

I really fell in love with the spotlights that were used during the players' introductions this past season. Sometimes it can be a challenge (or it just doesn't work out) when using the spotlights, mainly because the light might not hit the player's face/body enough or it creates a large shadow.

"It was the perfect pose with the perfect light."

But I got lucky when Packers cornerback Jaire Alexander strutted out of the dark tunnel before the NFC Divisional playoff game against the Seattle Seahawks. Jaire perfectly stepped right into the spotlight. It was the perfect pose with the perfect light. This image was shot with a 400mm lens (ISO = 640, Aperture = 2.8, Shutter = 1/1600th).

Mr. Gary

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Mr. Gary

Textures and bokehs can really add creativity to an image. It's a simple portrait of rookie Rashan Gary, but the symmetrical lights and bokeh pattern from the crowd really make this image stand out. This image was shot with a 85mm lens (ISO = 1250, Aperture = 2, Shutter = 1/4000th).

Field work

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Field work

Every time the Packers step foot on Clarke Hinkle Field for practice, I'm always capturing a wide-angle image with Lambeau Field in the background. This image was shot with a 35mm lens (ISO = 100, Aperture = 2.2, Shutter = 1/8000th).

A step ahead

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A step ahead

We all know that receiver Davante Adams is a playmaker, and anytime he makes a catch or touchdown I know it's going to be a good photo because of his athletic abilities. I really like this moment I captured of Adams, and it's not because of the catch but because he just beat 49ers Pro Bowl cornerback Richard Sherman on the play. This image was shot with a 400mm lens (ISO = 2500, Aperture = 2.8, Shutter = 1/2500th).

QB destroyer

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QB destroyer

I captured this image during the last regular-season game of 2019 between the Packers and Detroit Lions.

"Smith is a total quarterback destroyer."

Two simple things on why this photo is worthy. 1. Lions quarterback David Blough grabbing his upper chest/neck, as if he just got ruined on the play. 2. Za'Darius Smith's body language and facial expression. Smith is a total quarterback destroyer. This image was shot with a 400mm lens (ISO = 3200, Aperture = 2.8, Shutter = 1/3200th).

Dance party

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Dance party

It's pretty easy to get an image of Jamaal Williams dancing on the field somewhere. Before every game he walks around the football field listening to music on his headphones, while busting moves and playing catch with fans. During a game he even might dance a little bit after making a big run or touchdown. Heck, he even dances all the time on the practice field. It's his trademark.

"This photo just makes me smile."

Now, he even has his teammate Aaron Jones doing it, at least on the practice field. So, after the Packers went on to defeat the Oakland Raiders, I captured this image of them as they danced around before heading into the players' tunnel. This photo just makes me smile. This image was shot with a 35mm lens (ISO = 100, Aperture = 2, Shutter = 1/3200th).

Making room

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Making room

Documenting the offensive line can be a challenge because it's not the most glamorous position to get jaw-dropping imagery. Some of the best imagery comes from their one-on-one battles with defenders or creating holes for the running backs. One of my favorite O-line images came against the Detroit Lions at Lambeau Field. It shows offensive linemen Billy Turner, Corey Linsley, Elgton Jenkins and David Bakhtiari, partially seen, as they battle in the trenches, creating a big hole for running back Jamaal Williams to run through. I just like the grit, power and flow to the image. This image was shot with a 400mm lens (ISO = 3200, Aperture = 2.8, Shutter = 1/3200th).

King of the North

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King of the North

It was a pretty sweet feeling when the Packers clinched the NFC North title and claimed their first-ever game at U.S. Bank Stadium last December in Minnesota.

"There’s nothing better than documenting jubilation."

There were heaps of great plays from the 23-10 victory, but I think the best moments came behind closed doors in the locker room. Seeing Head Coach Matt LaFleur get hoisted up by the players was a special moment. There's nothing better than documenting jubilation.

This image was shot with a 35mm lens (ISO = 4000, Aperture = 2, Shutter = 1/640th).

D-Train!

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D-Train!

The Packers' defensive squad was pretty creative this season, from the group portrait in the end zone to the popular D-Train dance. I really liked this composition of the defensive unit as they performed the D-Train dance in the end zone during the Panthers game.

"Picture-perfect if you ask me."

The frame showcases Za'Darius leading the way, beneath a dusk snowy sky at Lambeau Field. Picture-perfect if you ask me. This image was shot with a 35mm lens (ISO = 800, Aperture = 2, Shutter = 1/1600th).

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